Notable People: All

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  • Clara Hale Babcock

    The daughter of a Methodist minister, Clara Celestia Hale Babcock was ordained in 1888. The first woman ordained in the Christian Churches, she held pastorates in four churches, conducted numerous evangelistic meetings and personally baptized at least 1,500 people.

  • Sarah Lue Bostick

    Sarah Lue Bostick was among the first African American women ordained to the Christian ministry in the late 19th century. She labored as a field worker for the Christian Woman’s Board of Missions and the National Christian Missionary Society among African American congregations in Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. She carried on her successful work for over 40 years, until her retirement in 1938.

  • Raymond Brown

    Raymond Brown held a variety of positions at the general church level including serving as the first Vice Moderator of the Christian Church. During his four year presidency at National Christian Missionary Convention he became instrumental in merging the predominantly African American organization with the General Convention.

  • Alexander Campbell

    Alexander Campbell was an early leader in the Second Great Awakening of the religious movement that has been referred to as the Restoration Movement, or Stone-Campbell Movement. The Campbell wing of the movement was said to begin with his father Thomas Campbell's publication in 1809 in Washington County, Pennsylvania, of The Declaration and Address of the Christian Association of Washington.

  • Thomas Campbell

    Thomas Campbell was a Presbyterian minister important in the Second Great Awakening of the United States. Born in County Down, northern Ireland, he began a religious reform movement on the American frontier. He was joined in the work by his son Alexander Campbell. Their movement, known as the "Disciples of Christ", merged in 1832 with the similar movement led by Barton W. Stone to form what is now described as the American Restoration Movement (also known as the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement).

  • Mendell Diness

    Most Disciples know that James T. Barclay was the first missionary of the Stone-Campbell heritage - sent by the American Christian Missionary Society to carry out the Biblical injunction "to preach the gospel first in Jerusalem." We now have information on a man who was one of Barclay's early converts - Mendell Diness.

  • Isaac Errett

    Known primarily as a writer, Errett served as editor of the Christian Standard. His weekly editorials and articles charted a moderately progressive course for the movement in the second half of the nineteenth century. A champion for the work of missionary societies, he helped organize the Christian Woman’s Board of Missions and served as the first president of the Foreign Christian Missionary Society.

  • Nicholas Brodie Hardeman

    As teacher and administrator, N. B. Hardeman deeply influenced generations of students and future ministers at two Henderson, Tennessee schools: Georgie Robertson Christian College and National Teachers’ Normal and Business College (later renamed Freed-Hardeman University).

  • Jeu Hawk

    Jeu Hawk pioneered Disciples missions among Asian-Americans in Portland Oregon in 1892. By the turn of the twentieth century, the Stone-Campbell movement had a presence in India, Japan, China, Tibet, and Burma.

  • David Lipscomb

    Among Southern Disciples, no one was more influential in the latter half of the nineteenth century than Nashville editor and teacher David Lipscomb. Born into a Baptist family with leanings toward the Campbells’ reform, Lipscomb claimed to have read everything Alexander Campbell wrote.

  • Walter Scott

    Walter Scott was one of the four key early leaders in the Restoration Movement, along with Barton W. Stone, Thomas Campbell and Thomas' son Alexander Campbell. He was a successful evangelist and helped to stabilize the Campbell movement as it was separating from the Baptists.

  • Barton Stone

    Barton Warren Stone was an important preacher during the Second Great Awakening of the early 19th century. He was first ordained a Presbyterian minister, then was expelled from the church after the Cane Ridge, Kentucky revival for his stated beliefs in faith as the sole prerequisite for salvation.

  • Emily Tubman

    The life of Emily Thomas Tubman reads like a fairy tale. How could a beautiful southern belle in a time when women had no vote and limited rights become administrator of a large Georgia plantation and later an even greater financial empire? Why would a woman of such wealth make it her life’s vocation to invest her resources carefully in a wide range of educational, churchly and community projects?

  • Minnie Vautrin

    Remembered as the “Goddess of Nanking”, Minnie Vautrin devoted her career to her students in China, first at Luchowfu Girls’ School and then at Ginling College in Nanking. She served Ginling College as faculty member, dean of education and as president for two years.

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